Audience interaction with Twitter Reply

ABC journalists are being asked to  Unknownprovide Twitter handles so that their audiences can communicate directly with them.

The handles will be broadcast at the end of television stories. They are not intended to replace report indentifications at the beginning of television news packages. More…

The Twittering Classes 1

The Internet abolished journalists’ dominance of international news. Twitter eclipsed political reporters’ control of the political debate.

Politicians’ news conferences, broadcast live, are dissected by running commentaries and analysis by a galaxy of often anonymous microbloggers. MSM (mainstream media)  journalists have been running to catch up. More…

Journalists and social media 1

How do you find out how journalists are using social media? One way is to post a question on a social media site such as the Online Journalism group on Linkedin, which provides connections for professionals. I admitted that I was asking an open ended question to expose myself to new ideas so that  I could hopefully write more informed articles.

Some respondents said they simply used social media to publicise their stories.

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How to tweet the news 6

Twitter is often maligned as fast and simple chat for empty headed gossips. This may be often true.

But if its combined with good journalism fact checking, it can help create an unprecedented network of sources providing global reach, diversity and credibility.

Jess Hill, 28, is a reporter and producer at ABC Radio current affairs. Her Twitter site shows she’s following more than three thousand other chatters; a distinct contrast to celebrity journalists who talk more than they might appear to listen. She began using Twitter for reporting on the first day of the Libyan protests. Instead of trying to find people on conventional contact lists, she began putting messages out on Twitter asking,  “Does anyone in #….  know about… and then have a conversation back and forth” But how did she know the people she was chatting with were who they said they were? More…

Disasters : journalist-free reporting? 1

Will mainstream journalists, who used to mediate between the public and government in disasters, be simply left out of the loop by social media?  In the twenty four hours during the peak of the flood crisis, Queensland police media had thirty nine million hits on their Facebook site. The public used their computers, laptops and smart phones to by-pass the conventional mass media and communicate directly with the authorities. In this year’s floods, Queensland local government and the state Police Service used Twitter and Facebook to disseminate flood warnings and information about local conditions. More…

Reporting Disasters : Social media and the floods 1

Social media were a mixed blessing  as authorities struggled to inform the public during the Queensland floods disaster.

That’s the interim finding of the the Queensland Floods Royal Commission, which today made a series of recommendations on how the public might be better informed during disasters. Queensland local government and the state Police Service used  Twitter and Facebook to disseminate flood warnings and information about local conditions during this year’s catastrophic floods. More…

Murdoch’s paywalls don’t work : Mark Scott Reply

Media organisations should ride the internet wave, not try to turn back the tide, according to Mark Scott, the Managing Director of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Speaking at the Journalism Education Conference in Sydney, Scott attacked Rupert Murdoch’s firewalls around News content.

The boldest paywall experiment is underway globally with [Murdoch's] The Times in London. But as Clay Shirky points out, before the paywall went up the two Times websites had
roughly six times more readers than there were print sales of the paper. Post paywall, the web audience is less than a sixth of print sales and the paying web isless than a twentieth of print sales, possibly far less. And at the same time, circulation for the print editions of these newspapers has continued to decline at the same dramatic rate as other papers in the UK market.

With so much content available free online, there would be a struggle to obtain a price for content, unless it was “extraordinarily distinctive”. In the UK, because non-subscribers could not read Times stories forwarded by friends or those linked through Twitter or Facebook, the stories remained locked in a very limited and narrow world speaking only to itself. More…