ABC News goes multi-media Reply

mcmurtThe Australian Broadcasting Corporation plans to launch a seamless, new multi media News process.

Under the News system being tested this week, desk editors and producers were working with Chief of Staff desks and day editors in the Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane newsrooms to coordinate national stories, from commissioning through to production – across all platforms. More…

The limits of citizen journalism 3

Why were new media able to topple governments in Egypt and Tunisia, but sparked new waves of oppression in Syria and Iran?

During the Arab Spring last year, citizen journalists, using Facebook, Twitter, email and iPhones, undermined state censorship and contributed to the success of massive pro-democracy demonstrations in Cairo and Tunis. Yet in Iran, many of the activists were arrested while in  the case of the Iranian ally, Syria, the government simply attacked with tanks.

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Journalism research by journalists 1

How do you reveal the best journalism practices to the very best journalism students?

After establishing a coursework journalism Masters program two decades ago, UTS this year launches Australia’s first Graduate School of Journalism. The School aims to become Australia’s premiere journalism education provider by underpinning its successful post graduate journalism teaching with research on journalism by journalists. More…

Reporting Disasters : managing risk 2

Covering the unprecedented string of international disasters and political insurrections can be a decidedly risky business.

In the last few months, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation deployed journalists to report on  domestic floods and cyclones, the earthquakes in New Zealand and Japan and the popular uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain and Libya.

ABC Head of  International News, Steven Alward said the ABC had about twenty correspondents deployed overseas. The international events had “stretched resources”. More…

Murdoch’s paywalls don’t work : Mark Scott Reply

Media organisations should ride the internet wave, not try to turn back the tide, according to Mark Scott, the Managing Director of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Speaking at the Journalism Education Conference in Sydney, Scott attacked Rupert Murdoch’s firewalls around News content.

The boldest paywall experiment is underway globally with [Murdoch's] The Times in London. But as Clay Shirky points out, before the paywall went up the two Times websites had
roughly six times more readers than there were print sales of the paper. Post paywall, the web audience is less than a sixth of print sales and the paying web isless than a twentieth of print sales, possibly far less. And at the same time, circulation for the print editions of these newspapers has continued to decline at the same dramatic rate as other papers in the UK market.

With so much content available free online, there would be a struggle to obtain a price for content, unless it was “extraordinarily distinctive”. In the UK, because non-subscribers could not read Times stories forwarded by friends or those linked through Twitter or Facebook, the stories remained locked in a very limited and narrow world speaking only to itself. More…