Television News Clichés Reply

a9b7453d1ba06933f33162ea1e1218c1Television news cliches give the ABC’s Alan Sunderland a nervous twitch.

Sunderland, ABC News head of policy, is upset about  “those annoying clichés that infect our work”.

You know what I’m talking about. We’ve all been guilty of it at one time or another.

So I’m taking a stand. Or to be more accurate, I’m making a list.

It’s a list of things I never want to see or hear again. They were bearable the first 7,648 times. Now it’s over. More…

Newsgathering with Tweetdeck Reply

tweetdeckHow do you ensure accuracy with speed, so that social media driven journalism is credible?

Conciseness, the ability to summarise complex stories in the 140 characters demanded by microblogs such as Twitter, should already be a given.

However,  some twitterati  often appear to be unconcerned whether the information they distribute is correct, coherent or even recent.

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ABC News goes multi-media Reply

mcmurtThe Australian Broadcasting Corporation plans to launch a seamless, new multi media News process.

Under the News system being tested this week, desk editors and producers were working with Chief of Staff desks and day editors in the Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane newsrooms to coordinate national stories, from commissioning through to production – across all platforms. More…

Regulate News? 1

conroyHistory’s worst mass murderers have been joined by Australia’s Communications Minister, Stephen Conroy, if you believe News Limited‘s big circulation Australian newspaper, the Telegraph.  The Telegraph was reacting to Conroy’s announcement yesterday that the government would legislate to create a Public Interest Media Advocate. More…

Free Speech Reply

spigelBeing offensive should not be illegal, according to Jim Spigelman, the Chair of the ABC.

Mr Spigelman was giving the 2012 Human Rights Day Oration at the Australian Human Rights Commission’s 25th Human Rights Award Ceremony.

Laws restricting hate speech should aim to protect people’s dignity against assault, he said. But “declaring conduct, relevantly speech, to be unlawful, because it causes offence, goes too far.” More…

Quality journalism and the demise of newspapers. Reply

We took newspapers for granted. They were cheap, mostly informative, often entertaining and available just about everywhere. But they could also be an addictive cultural ritual which gauged the complexity and intellectual vigour of the city where they were based.

They were a mixed bag of delights. More…

Making Australian media acountable : the Finkelstein report 6

Australian media are not as accountable as a democracy might expect.

That’s the view of the Australian government’s Independent Inquiry into Media and Media Regulations, conducted by a retired judge, Ray Finkelstein.

Australia has a very narrow mainstream media ownership by democratic standards. One foreign media group dominates the newspapers, while the taxpayer funded ABC generates the bulk of electronic media news and current affairs.

Finkelstein as seen by the Sydney Morning Herald

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Journalism research by journalists 1

How do you reveal the best journalism practices to the very best journalism students?

After establishing a coursework journalism Masters program two decades ago, UTS this year launches Australia’s first Graduate School of Journalism. The School aims to become Australia’s premiere journalism education provider by underpinning its successful post graduate journalism teaching with research on journalism by journalists. More…

How to tweet the news 6

Twitter is often maligned as fast and simple chat for empty headed gossips. This may be often true.

But if its combined with good journalism fact checking, it can help create an unprecedented network of sources providing global reach, diversity and credibility.

Jess Hill, 28, is a reporter and producer at ABC Radio current affairs. Her Twitter site shows she’s following more than three thousand other chatters; a distinct contrast to celebrity journalists who talk more than they might appear to listen. She began using Twitter for reporting on the first day of the Libyan protests. Instead of trying to find people on conventional contact lists, she began putting messages out on Twitter asking,  “Does anyone in #….  know about… and then have a conversation back and forth” But how did she know the people she was chatting with were who they said they were? More…

Investigative Journalism : the long Asbestos trail 3

It’s a bit depressing when your key contacts keep dying on you, according to ABC journalist Matt Peacock. Peacock, who began investigating James Hardie Asbestos in 1977, reckons that up to 60,000 Australians could eventually die from disease caused by asbestos industrial products. In a forty year career in journalism, Peacock worked on  investigative programs including This Day Tonight, Four Corners and the 730 Report. Last year, he released the book on his investigations into asbestos, Killer Company.

Peacock’s interest in asbestos was sparked by an inquiry about an innocent interview Peacock had broadcast, made by a PR consultant representing the asbestos company. “I had to play it back to find it [the reference] ,” Peacock said. There was a brief claim  by the interviewee who said, “It’s not all bad. Some companies have really cleaned up their act, notably the asbestos company, James Hardie”. Peacock asked himself why a PR company was monitoring “a fairly obscure Radio National program and wanting to use this quote”? “It was just a bit too strange. What were they trying to cover up?” More…