Television News Clichés Reply

a9b7453d1ba06933f33162ea1e1218c1Television news cliches give the ABC’s Alan Sunderland a nervous twitch.

Sunderland, ABC News head of policy, is upset about  “those annoying clichés that infect our work”.

You know what I’m talking about. We’ve all been guilty of it at one time or another.

So I’m taking a stand. Or to be more accurate, I’m making a list.

It’s a list of things I never want to see or hear again. They were bearable the first 7,648 times. Now it’s over. More…

Newsgathering with Tweetdeck Reply

tweetdeckHow do you ensure accuracy with speed, so that social media driven journalism is credible?

Conciseness, the ability to summarise complex stories in the 140 characters demanded by microblogs such as Twitter, should already be a given.

However,  some twitterati  often appear to be unconcerned whether the information they distribute is correct, coherent or even recent.

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Insuring free speech Reply

114121_originalTweeters, bloggers and freelance journalists will be able to insure against defamation actions against them, in a scheme announced by the Media Alliance.

While the internet enabled freelance journalists to self publish, it also meant that independent journalists no longer had an umbrella of employers’ legal protection.

Australia has no constitutional guarantees of free speech, allowing the wealthy or well connected to target their online critics with costly legal actions. Journalists have been faced with the choice of going silent or talking a loan to pay for a lawyer. More…

Voicing the voiceless : Swara 1

swaracover-smallNews is being re-defined in India where citizen journalists use mobile phones  to create a grass roots news gathering network.

To seek accuracy and foster credibility, their stories were fact checked by professional journalists employed to review submitted material. More…

Free Speech Reply

spigelBeing offensive should not be illegal, according to Jim Spigelman, the Chair of the ABC.

Mr Spigelman was giving the 2012 Human Rights Day Oration at the Australian Human Rights Commission’s 25th Human Rights Award Ceremony.

Laws restricting hate speech should aim to protect people’s dignity against assault, he said. But “declaring conduct, relevantly speech, to be unlawful, because it causes offence, goes too far.” More…

New media and the US elections 3

New media revolutionised US Presidential elections through fund raising, fact checking and crowd sourcing, according to Tom Shaller ( @schaller67 ).

Social media offered fast, if not always accurate, coverage.

Schaller , Professor of political science at the University of Maryland, was speaking at a master class on media and US politics at the UTS Graduate School of Journalism. Tom Schaller is a regular political columnist for the Baltimore Sun and is the author of a number of books on politics. His visit to Australia was sponsored by the US government. More…

Reporting on a “closed”community : the Block Reply

How do you report on the heart and soul of what was said to be one of Sydney’s toughest suburbs?

Gina McKeon won the Walkley young journalist of the year for her story on the St Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Redfern which was part of a 50-minute documentary on the Block, broadcast on FBi Radio’s All The Best. More…

“One sided” coverage of media inquiry : Press Council Chair 2

The press coverage of the inquiry into Australian media exemplified what was wrong, Julian Disney, the Chair of the Australian Press Council  said tonight. “It was very one sided,” he said.

Professor Disney was speaking at a forum organised in Sydney by the Australian Centre for Independent Journalism to discuss the Finkelstein report. The inquiry recommended a government funded institution to require press accountability.

Julian Disney

Julian Disney

There was insufficient information in the press about what was actually in the report, Disney said. “You had to go online to get a half way decent description of what was in it”.  There was “no significant attempt” by most news papers to get the views of ordinary people.

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Distinctly different online journalism : the Global Mail 1

Photo by Millie So

Monica Attard

Australians are not so much poorly served, as minimally served, by their mainstream media, according to multi-award winning journalist, Monica Attard.

Ms Attard is a former foreign correspondent who reported on the disintegration of the Soviet Union, returning to Australia to present the national radio current affairs program, PM. She left the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) to found a new, independent quality journal, the Global Mail. She was speaking in Sydney at the launch of the UTS Graduate School of Journalism.

There was a political divide in Australian newspapers between the dominant group, News Limited and the Sydney and Melbourne based Fairfax Media, Attard said.

 And then there’s the ABC, my spiritual home, beating the middle path, but with its own set of  problems…not enough cash ever to mount new programs and experiment with different forms of journalism. More…

Journalism research by journalists 1

How do you reveal the best journalism practices to the very best journalism students?

After establishing a coursework journalism Masters program two decades ago, UTS this year launches Australia’s first Graduate School of Journalism. The School aims to become Australia’s premiere journalism education provider by underpinning its successful post graduate journalism teaching with research on journalism by journalists. More…