Foreign Correspondent turns 104 Reply

image0065

Clare and Zhou Enlai

If you have ever been to the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club, you might have seen  the Grande Dame of journalism, Clare Hollingworth, holding court in the library. The library has a special place in journalism, not that there are many books there. If you managed to get your self killed on assignment in the Viet Nam war, you got to have you photo on the wall there. Clare was on assignment long before that. She covered the Nazi invasion of Poland in 1939. She’s now 104! More…

Advertisements

The limits of citizen journalism 3

Why were new media able to topple governments in Egypt and Tunisia, but sparked new waves of oppression in Syria and Iran?

During the Arab Spring last year, citizen journalists, using Facebook, Twitter, email and iPhones, undermined state censorship and contributed to the success of massive pro-democracy demonstrations in Cairo and Tunis. Yet in Iran, many of the activists were arrested while in  the case of the Iranian ally, Syria, the government simply attacked with tanks.

More…

Distinctly different online journalism : the Global Mail 1

Photo by Millie So

Monica Attard

Australians are not so much poorly served, as minimally served, by their mainstream media, according to multi-award winning journalist, Monica Attard.

Ms Attard is a former foreign correspondent who reported on the disintegration of the Soviet Union, returning to Australia to present the national radio current affairs program, PM. She left the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) to found a new, independent quality journal, the Global Mail. She was speaking in Sydney at the launch of the UTS Graduate School of Journalism.

There was a political divide in Australian newspapers between the dominant group, News Limited and the Sydney and Melbourne based Fairfax Media, Attard said.

 And then there’s the ABC, my spiritual home, beating the middle path, but with its own set of  problems…not enough cash ever to mount new programs and experiment with different forms of journalism. More…

Journalism research by journalists 1

How do you reveal the best journalism practices to the very best journalism students?

After establishing a coursework journalism Masters program two decades ago, UTS this year launches Australia’s first Graduate School of Journalism. The School aims to become Australia’s premiere journalism education provider by underpinning its successful post graduate journalism teaching with research on journalism by journalists. More…

Reporting Disasters : journalism minders in Libya Reply

As the Libyan civil war hotted up, reporters crossed the border into danger, to get the story.

When they did so, Shaun Filer was there to try to keep them safe.

Some journalists believed that if you got one step closer to the fighting, the more chance you had of getting the big story, Filer said. “In many cases it was the photo journalists… who needed to get really close to get that image,” he said. “It’s not like text [reporting] or doing a piece to camera, the photo journalists needed to go forward”. While Filer was in Libya, a photo journalist was shot near the front lines. More…

Combat vests and macho men (and women) Reply

Writing about foreign correspondents has got me into a fair bit of trouble at times. A couple of years ago, I was foolish enough to suggest that in the age of the internet, many of them were just blow ins, decked out in safari suits, delivering rehashed locals’ stories, as they were videoed in front of exotic locations.
Obviously, I was wrong.
Safari suits are rarely worn these days.
In fact the favoured attire more recently, was the combat photographer’s vest, which had lots of little pockets where one could stash passports, hangover cures, condoms and other paraphernalia required to explore the Orient. More…